/Tag: Nutrition

Women’s Heart Health

By: Dr. Keara Taylor, ND Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among older post- menopausal women.  As women, the risk of cardiovascular disease is 2-3 times higher after menopause (1).  Statically, men are at a higher risk, however, as women age, their level of risk approaches that of men, and the lifetime risk for women may actually be higher because we live longer (2).  The risk of cardiovascular disease in women should not be underestimated, and because there appears to be a link between hormones and cardiovascular disease – we see rates increase significantly after menopause – we can and should be proactive in managing that risk, especially as we age. The average age of menopause in women is approximately 51, and is often accompanied by the immediate symptoms of hot flashes and night sweats. However, longer-term issues can also arise, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and cognitive impairment. The Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN) looked at the correlation between a menopausal woman’s experience of vasomotor symptoms like hot flashes with cardiovascular risk factors.  It found that vascular aging, endothelial dysfunction and large artery stiffening seemed to increase in women during the menopausal transition and that women with hot flushes had higher rates of subclinical cardiovascular disease (1). As women enter menopause, treating symptoms with bioidentical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT) may be a good option, and should be discussed with a health care practitioner. While the use of BHRT in menopause is beyond the scope of this article, here are some dietary and lifestyle practices that you can implement right now that have been shown in the literature to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events: […]

Dr. Kathleen Regan, ND’s Experience of Natural Birth

By Dr. Kathleen Regan, ND Some of you may know that I recently welcomed my first child into the world with a natural birth at the Toronto Birth Centre. My husband and I, along with our amazing team of midwives shared the amazing moment that our first-born son entered the world. […]

By |2018-06-21T15:51:14-04:00June 21st, 2018|ND Editorial, Women's Wellness|0 Comments

Meet Dr. Keara Taylor, Nautropathic Doctor

Q&A with Dr. Keara Taylor Dr. Keara is joining the Innate Wellness Team in High Park. She is a High Park local and a new mom with a general family practice. She will be taking over Dr. Regan’s maternity leave and staying on to build her practice at Innate. Learn more about her style of practice! […]

Nutrition Advice That Will Never Change

By Dr. Kathleen Regan, ND Are you considering a new diet for 2018? You may want to reconsider. A lot of diets restrict nutrients, which are essential for bodily function or increase nutrients that are unhealthy in high amounts over long periods of time. Health is found in balance, not restriction (although balance can sometimes feel like restriction!) The perfect place to start is with the macronutrients: Protein, Fat and Carbohydrates. Learning how to balance macronutrients will get you on the path to feeling better in 2018! […]

Nutrition for Healthy Breasts

By: Dr. Kathleen Regan, ND It is not a stretch to say that health begins with what you eat. This is true of breast health and hormonal health in general. Changes in breast tissue from benign cysts to breast cancer have been linked to estrogen balance within the body or “estrogen dominance”. “Estrogen dominance” is a term used to describe a high ratio of estrogen to progesterone or just globally high estradiol (one of the three types of possible estrogen). Estrogen dominance has been linked to many different types of women’s health issues besides breast health including PMS symptoms, menopausal symptoms, uterine fibroids, endometriosis, allergies, decreased libido, fatigue, fibrocystic breasts, headaches, infertility, irritability, and fat gain around the abdomen and on the top of the thighs. In addition, studies have shown a well-established link between excess estrogen and breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer and cervical dysplasia. The good news is that hormones are affected by nutrition. Modifying specific dietary and lifestyle habits can help to keep hormones balanced! The following list includes nutrition habits that negatively impact healthy estrogen balance and healthy breasts. […]

By |2017-10-17T13:48:47-04:00October 17th, 2017|ND Editorial, Nutrition, Women's Wellness|0 Comments

Porridge Two Ways

By Dr. Angelina Riopel, Naturopathic Doctor Porridge is a delicious and healthy winter staple. It is rich in fiber and a great way to balance blood sugar and help keep your appetite and cravings under control throughout the day. The health benefits of porridge can vary depending on the type of oats we use and what we serve it with. The traditional milk and brown sugar, although delicious, can have a negative effect on blood sugar and digestion. Oats are naturally gluten free, although can become contaminated during processing, so it is best to choose a gluten-free brand. Whole oats are preferable to quick oats, as they are lower on the glycemic index, meaning a more favorable effect on blood sugar levels. Try adding different combinations of the following power-foods to improve the nutrient content and flavor of your porridge. Oats themselves are a medicinal food known to strengthen and calm the nervous system. Cinnamon to help balance blood sugar Chia or flax seed will increase the fiber content Dried fruit (organic and sulfite –free) such as apricots, dates, prunes or raisons or Fresh fruit such as berries or bananas for flavor, fiber and nutrients Unsalted, raw nuts and seeds will increase the protein content of your porridge. You can also mix nuts and seeds together, in equal parts, and grind in a coffee grinder, then store in the freezer. This is an easy way to have all that nutrition ready to go! Try nut milk such as almond milk or coconut milk (I prefer canned), as a dairy alternative […]

By |2017-02-13T13:51:15-05:00December 13th, 2016|Nutrition, Recipes|0 Comments